A How-to Guide to Writing the Perfect Marketing Brief

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A How-to Guide to Writing the Perfect Marketing Brief

A solid brief can make or break a marketing campaign. The brief provides a solid foundation to ensure that an internal or external team is aligned to execute the strategy.

A marketing brief should accomplish 4 critical points for the team:

  • Explain the purpose of a given marketing strategy
  • Detail the measurements that will determine the success of a campaign
  • Identify the audience and expected outcomes of the project
  • Set clear goals, timelines, and responsible parties for the marketing campaign

Before constructing a marketing brief,

  1. Go over expectations with the creative team and stakeholders. If everyone knows the purpose of their contributions to the overall project, then quality work will ensue.

  2. Avoid jargon, lingo and acronyms.

  3. Remember to keep it simple but as detailed as possible.

During the process of creating a marketing brief,

  1. Constantly ask What, Why, Who, How, and When - details, details, details!

  2. Continually make the content engaging, relevant, clear, and factual. Since this brief is shared with the entire staff (and, in some cases, external parties), it is vital that the material is clean and concise to ensure the project’s success.

  3. Every decision made should tie back to the overall goal of the project.

Building the brief.

Three overall guidelines to follow: Define, Plan, and Evaluate.

Marketing Brief Notes

A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating a Marketing Brief

 

Define

  1. Background. Give a summary of product/brand/services. What are the core values of the company? What is the personality, philosophy or mission statement of the brand? Be as detailed as possible so that not only internally staffed members fully understand the purpose or existence of the business, but external parties like stakeholders, directors, ad agencies, and copywriters are fully informed. Detail pricing and selling processes as well. Describe the current situation.

  2. Objective.  Align priorities of the company. Why is this campaign beneficial and how will it advance the productivity of the brand/product? What is the overall goal of the campaign and what are the risks associated with it? What is this campaign supposed to communicate? Have the business' insights in mind.

  3. Budget. Determine the budget range for the marketing plan.

  4. Target Market. Is this marketing proposal targeted towards consumers (BtoC) or other businesses (BtoB)? How will the market be segmented and how will the product serve the given target audience? What type of consumer is interested and what data can be used to best cater to their needs? What factors influence purchase decisions? What are the barriers delaying a certain purchase? How can a company streamline the purchasing process?

  5. Competition. Describe the current market. What competing products are successful and why? Include other brands’ successes and failures. How are competitors marketing to public and what can be done to stand out next to them? What insights are valuable?

  6. Stakeholders. List everyone involved in the campaign and their responsibilities. (Who is in charge of design? Who is in charge of executing each marketing activity? Who will keep the creative team on the right timeline?)  It is helpful for the staff to know what relationships are at risk and who their work is benefiting?

  7. Mandatories. Clearly list the guidelines, terms and conditions, legal requirements, project deliverables, and disclaimers. All expectations should be laid out on the table so that there aren't any surprises. The brand’s tone and call to action are important to convey throughout the brief as well.

Plan

  1. Channel. Since data about the target market is already gathered, determine which channel is best to reach them, as well as the overall marketing mix. The right mix will depend on the marketing strategy and will likely involve email, social media, organic or paid search, printed or website deliverables or even TV media. Determine the destinations/channels of the deliverables: where will they live, on the website, on a blog, on partner sites, YouTube, or TV? Where will these marketing ads take the consumer and how will it impact the initiative’s ultimate goal? How will this campaign be executed?
  2. Time. Plan the launching of the campaign. Is it seasonal? Figure out the soft and hard deadlines. What are the major milestones that need to be completed with the campaign?
  3. Budget. After plan execution, map out expenses and compare with the initial budgeting framework.

Evaluate

  1. Measure. Outline certain measures of success and expectations (key performance indicators - KPIs - quantitative and qualitative goals, etc). Once project is completed, a post-mortem should be conducted by the project leader to compare predictions to actual results to determine if the campaign reached its full potential.

NOTE:

Marketing briefs are different from creative briefs!

Marketing Campaign Brief: This document states what the client would like the promotional campaign to achieve and is effectively the instructions for the team writing the promotional campaign.

Creative Brief: This is a document that the team writing the promotional campaign gives to an internal team or agency in response to the campaign brief. The creative brief states the ideas and information for the promotional campaign.

Want to get the perfect marketing brief? AgencySparks created a perfectly comprehensive, detailed marketing brief template available here.

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Marketers Toolbox: Visage

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Marketers Toolbox: Visage

Note: The Marketer’s Toolbox series teaches our readers about new technology we’re using (or experimenting with) that  is useful, productive, or entertaining. As a marketer’s secret weapon, the tools AgencySparks uses are vital to our success, thus, a marketer’s toolbox is truly one of our most important resources.

Marketers Toolbox: Visage

Proving the success of a campaign using data plugged into dull spreadsheets is widespread. Sometimes slide decks with graphics are available, but this process is time consuming.

Visage abandons the days of sending spreadsheets and slide decks in an attempt to prove success to a client, colleague, or stakeholder. Through a 3 step process, Visage learns what type of reports a company needs regularly and takes the data they are provided to create custom designed templates.

The delivery is then visually consistent with new data plugged into the templates for each subsequent reporting.

PRICING:

Basic, Brand, and Enterprise pricing to provide clients with visually pleasing content. 

Visage makes it simple to share a story using data in a visually appealing way.

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One Size Does Not Fit All: A Marketing Personalization Guide Inspired by Jeff Bezos

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One Size Does Not Fit All: A Marketing Personalization Guide Inspired by Jeff Bezos

In a world where everything is digital, screens are beginning to replace face-to-face interaction. And with that lack of face-to-face interaction, brands like Amazon, Target, and Spotify have turned away from segmentation marketing and towards personalized marketing tactics - using data every step of the way.  

How to Customize Marketing Efforts

Amazon has quickly become the pioneer of personalization. Jeff Bezos, the company’s founder and CEO, believes every company should work for something bigger than themselves and have customers at the heart of their organization. His recipe for a successful business consists of three key ingredients:

  1. Customer Centricity
  2. Long-term thinking
  3. Passion for invention

Customer Centricity

Bezos describes the idea of customer centricity as being “the host of the party.” The host wants everything to be perfect for the guest and hopes that, in return, the guest will speak highly of their experience to others and come back again. 

“If you do build a great experience, customers tell each other about that. Word of mouth is very powerful.” - Jeff Bezos

In a nutshell, placing customers in the center of a marketing strategy means making products that cater to their current needs and desires. Fortunately, marketers have plenty of tools, like social media, customer relationship management (CRM) software, and big data at their disposal to determine what those needs and desires are. 
 
Social listening adds the ability for marketers to interact with customers in real time. By addressing negative comments and reacting to positive ones, marketers can get a feel for how their brand is perceived and identify gaps in their value proposition. Additionally, marketers can leverage social media to humanize their brand. 

Key Questions Marketers Can Ask Themselves to ensure a customer-centric approach:

  • What are the stages of my particular product/service’s customer journey and am I meeting my prospects at every stage of the journey? 
  • How am I interacting with my prospects at every stage of the customer journey and is it congruent with how they interact with my brand at that stage?
  • What are my customers’ ultimate desires and how does my product/service address these desires?
  • Who are my most valuable customers? What is most important to them? How am I rewarding their loyalty?
  • Who are my least valuable customers? How can I transform them into more valuable customers?

Long-Term Thinking

CEO, founder, and billionare of Amazon, Jeff Bezos

Bezos emphasizes that long-term thinking is like growing a plant. After a solid groundwork is built, a seed can grow and branch out. Although Amazon has gone through a great deal of revolution as a company, they have always aimed to be trustworthy. This simple goal has laid the foundation for Amazon to grow long-term, branching into new markets without limits.
 
In order to build consumer trust that eventually sustains long-term success, companies need to invest in understanding and leveraging their data. With a careful analysis of market trends, purchasing patterns, and pricing recommendations, marketers can adapt their products, prices, and services to what their audience wants proactively, enabling their brand to stay relevant in a constantly changing market.

Passion for Invention

Humans are an innovative, inventive species. From newspapers to digital media, marketers have found new ways to cater to audiences on their terms. With the emergence  of diverse consumer preferences, coupled with a cluttered digital space, marketing to demographic segments alone just doesn’t cut it anymore. Marketers have adapted, turning instead to psychographics and finding supportive tribes.

“When you send everyone the same email, demand everyone learn from the same lesson plan or try to sell everyone the same service, you've missed it.” -  Seth Godin

Because everyone is different, treating everyone the same is a disservice to the loyal consumers.

So how does a company create a customized marketing strategy?

Analytics can tell marketers the demographic details of their site visitors, how visitors came across their website, and the way people engage with their website. Once marketers understand the patterns that the data establishes, customization becomes possible.

This is an example of an Amazon account by blogger, Amanda Zantal-Wiener. Based on previous searches and buys, Amazon has crafted a home page with items similar to Amanda's previous interests. Customization like this leads to more unplanned purchases. 

This is an example of an Amazon account by blogger, Amanda Zantal-Wiener. Based on previous searches and buys, Amazon has crafted a home page with items similar to Amanda's previous interests. Customization like this leads to more unplanned purchases. 

After AgencySparks CEO and founder, Joe Koufman, spent a vacation with his wife, Airbnb sent these two key chains with a hand written letter thanking them for their stay. Companies that customize their approach leave a long-lasting impression.

After AgencySparks CEO and founder, Joe Koufman, spent a vacation with his wife, Airbnb sent these two key chains with a hand written letter thanking them for their stay. Companies that customize their approach leave a long-lasting impression.

To do customization properly, careful research, planning, and testing should take place to ensure the target market is interested and open to highly customized  marketing messages.

While customizing on the internet is possible due to analytics, Bezos states that sometimes “physical is stronger than digital.” If everyone in the industry is capitalizing on digital customization, try switching focus to a more tangible reminder to humanize the brand and make the consumer feel special.
 

Note: Be wary of observing behaviors.

Target was in a pickle for being too “creepy” for noticing certain purchasing behaviors and acting on it. Find the perfect balance.
 
 

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An Entrepreneur on the Road to Success Thanks to Relationships, Business Evolution, and Values

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An Entrepreneur on the Road to Success Thanks to Relationships, Business Evolution, and Values

“Brands struggle to find the right marketing agencies. Agencies struggle to find the right brands. AgencySparks is the matchmaker bridging the gap between brands and agencies.”  

This was the idea that Joe Koufman, founder and CEO of AgencySparks, hammered home in two of his most recent interviews. 

Following the interviews with Nathan Latka, of “The Top” Podcast and the Dana Barrett Show on Biz 1190, AgencySparks’ CEO, Joe, spoke about the upcoming changes for the company, the need for AgencySparks in the marketplace, and his entrepreneurial journey.
 

Joe Koufman (right), AgencySparks founder and CEO, with host Dana Barrett (left) of "The Dana Barrett Show" on Biz 1190 

Joe Koufman (right), AgencySparks founder and CEO, with host Dana Barrett (left) of "The Dana Barrett Show" on Biz 1190 

Three major takeaways that provide entrepreneurial success and a competitive advantage emerged from the interviews: 

  1. Emphasis on Relationships 
  2. Room to Evolve
  3. Tireless Commitment to Core Values
     

An Emphasis on Relationships

In Nathan Latka’s podcast, titled “The Top”, Joe discussed how he has always excelled at making connections in his professional life, as well as his personal life. This passion enabled his ascent to success in multiple marketing agencies. Amidst his agency-side journey, Joe noticed the disconnected, troublesome road to finding a “perfect fit” between brands and marketing agencies, thus, the idea for AgencySparks was born.  After Joe left the agency world, he turned down multiple job offers to create the initial business model for AgencySparks:
AgencySparks is the “dating service for brands and agencies,” Joe told Latke. “[We strive to] make connections between brands and agencies.” 

AgencySparks makes connections between brand and agency marketers in a number of ways. One way is by holding quarterly Marketing Breakfasts. Here, Joe’s team listens to the concerns of clients about the marketplace and facilitates introductions in a more personal and comfortable environment. 

Joe Koufman leading a discussion between Atlanta's top marketing brand and agency executives at the last AgencySparks' Marketers Breakfast.

Joe Koufman leading a discussion between Atlanta's top marketing brand and agency executives at the last AgencySparks' Marketers Breakfast.

AgencySparks’ culture of connectivity starts internally. Everyone on the team is encouraged to share their ideas and opinions and potential opportunities for the company. He noted Greg Crabtree’s labor efficiency ratio to Latka: the need to bring in 2.5/3.5 in revenue for every dollar spent on payroll. If the ratio is high, his staff needs to increase as to not burn his team out. However, if it is too low, the profitability will suffer from too many employees. 

AgencySparks' team at a staff bonding event at Escape the Room. 

AgencySparks' team at a staff bonding event at Escape the Room. 

Key takeaway: Relationships are everything. How you interact and treat your clients and staff matters. Success is reflective of how relationships are fostered.

Room to Evolve

AgencySparks is continuing to adapt to the need of the market and clients. Since the founding in 2014, AgencySparks has experimented with additional service offerings.  2017 is a big year for AgencySparks, bringing along plenty of changes. 

For one, the business model has evolved to benefit the clients even more. AgencySparks understands there is just not a single best agency for all clients. This insight led to the expansion of service offerings to include multiple agencies in each category, an Agency-Client Speed Dating service, and an option for clients to outsource their RFP process to AgencySparks. Now, when a brand asks for multiple agency options, AgencySparks has the ability to deliver. The speed dating format enables the client exposure to several potential partners without investing a lot of time and energy which results in a more efficienct selection process. The process often results in a more “perfect fit.”

Click here to fill out a free, confidential form used as the basis of conversation between brand and agency. 

AgencySparks is also a valuable resource for marketing agencies. AgencySparks is working on a training series that enables agencies to improve their business development efforts. The web product is scheduled to launch in June 2017. 

Key Takeaway: Markets and clients will often dictate shifts in service offerings. Companies must evolve so they can thrive.

A Tireless Commitment to Core Values

 
Maintaining business values and a core mission statement are essential for growth and success.
 

AgencySparks firmly stays true to its values - emphasizing them at every weekly company meeting.  Ensuring the entire team is aligned with the values enables the company to remain consistent as it grows. Also, clients like working with companies with compatible values.

Key Takeaway: Companies that live their core values tend to thrive more than those that have no clearly defined values.

AgencySparks continues to challenge the market to unlock the keys to success. By staying true to the core values, adapting to the market, and constructing solid and loyal relationships, AgencySparks is experiencing significant growth and setting itself up for the next phase of opportunities.


Key Takeaways from Nathan Latka’s “The Top Podcast”

Nathan Latka has one of the most well known business podcasts, "The Top" about successful start-ups and entrepreneurs. 
  • As a CEO of a company, if you’re not pulling out the salary that you would be making as a hired CEO, then your business is NOT profitable.
  • Continue to grow your business as much as you can, but be mindful of the interesting offers that come along the way.
  • Invest in relationships.

Key Takeaways from The Dana Barrett Show:

  • What is right for one brand, is different for another...hence the need of a matchmaker like AgencySparks
  • Adjust business model depending on marketplace need 
  • Integrity is of utmost importance in any business interaction
     

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AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive content updates from AgencySparks, click here to subscribe!
Marketers Toolbox: Zapier

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Marketers Toolbox: Zapier

Note: The Marketer’s Toolbox series teaches our readers about new technology we’re using (or experimenting with) that  is useful, productive, or entertaining. As a marketer’s secret weapon, the tools AgencySparks uses are vital to our success, thus, a marketer’s toolbox is truly one of our most important resources.

Marketers Toolbox: Zapier

It is tempting to use every new marketing application that is released, but the tools that are supposed to make jobs easier can quickly become a hindrance.

Zapier connects common apps in automated workflows removing the use of redundant apps thus allowing administrative busy work to become a thing of the past. With a few clicks, web apps connect to share data automatically. Zapier also provides a simple self set-up that does not require user coding.

How Zaps connects every day applications. 

PRICING:  

Zapier tool pricing options: free versus premium selections. 

Zapier seeks to remove busywork by automating administrative tasks up to 750 commonly used applications.

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AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive content updates from AgencySparks, click here to subscribe!
Why We Should Transition From Demographic Marketing - A Perspective from Seth Godin

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Why We Should Transition From Demographic Marketing - A Perspective from Seth Godin

AgencySpearks CEO, Joe Koufman, asks Seth Godin a question during the most recent Digital Summit conference.

AgencySpearks CEO, Joe Koufman, asks Seth Godin a question during the most recent Digital Summit conference.


Every marketing campaign begins with a simple question: Who?  For decades, the answer to this question has revolved around outward characteristics of an individual. What is their race? How old are they? What’s their gender? For marketers, segmenting an audience based on demographic data has always been simple, accessible, and affordable.

However, the world is not that simple. Not everything is black and white. 

The market is changing, becoming more complex and diverse than ever. The internet has provided marketers with more data with deeper insights - not only about what people are, but who people are. Data tells marketers people’s interests, buying preferences, and what they expect in a product/service. People are unconsciously segmenting themselves just by browsing the internet. According to Seth Godin, it’s important to leverage this data to identify groups of like-minded people, called “tribes”:

“What tribes are, is a very simple concept that goes back 50 million years. It’s about leading and connecting people and ideas. And it’s something people have wanted forever.”

- Seth Godin

Seth Godin is a marketing guru and bestselling author who built his career on finding the small populations with common threads of interest (i.e. Game of Thrones cosplayers or Seinfeld Junkies), and connecting those populations to one another. In the video below, Godin discusses how marketers can get their ideas to spread, highlighting three simple steps: 

  1. Find out what people want
  2. Talk to someone who will spread the word
  3. Don’t play it safe

Step 1 - Find out what people want

Psychographics
If demographic segmentation represents outward traits (race, gender, age, etc.), then psychographic segmentation hones in on inward traits (personality traits, values, attitudes, interests, etc.). With the power of data, psychographic segmentation is catching on.

demographics vs psychographics

Alexander Nix, CEO of Cambridge Analytica, has explored the power of big data and psychographics at great length in his research.  His “OCEAN" acronym describes his findings which showed that adult human’s personality can qualify for psychographic segmentation under 5 categories and these traits can be used to influence data: 

Alexander Nix's OCEAN acronym on psychographics. Includes openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism.

By understanding the personality of our consumers, marketers can manipulate more nuanced variables like tone, channel, or content in ads to influence and connect with consumers on an individual level. 

 

Step 2 - Talk to someone who cares and will spread the word

There are two ways marketers can do this: 

  • Connecting with influencers
  • Guiding people to a “tribe”

Regardless of the route a marketer takes, it’s about drilling down into a subset of the population.

Influencers
Marketers can leverage influencers to build trust within a target segment. Ideally, these influencers would have a natural affinity for the product being marketed, as well as a pre-established audience that trusts them.

Beauty bloggers have represented a huge opportunity for marketers to engage in influencer marketing. 

Beauty bloggers have represented a huge opportunity for marketers to engage in influencer marketing. 

Harley pinpoints their audience as those who value community (or in Nix’s terms, are “agreeable.”) The fact that people identify with the Harley brand by tattooing it on themselves shows their sense of community. Harley enthusiasts chose the brand because it offers them a change in lifestyle and perception.

Harley pinpoints their audience as those who value community (or in Nix’s terms, are “agreeable.”) The fact that people identify with the Harley brand by tattooing it on themselves shows their sense of community. Harley enthusiasts chose the brand because it offers them a change in lifestyle and perception.

Tribes
In Seth Godin’s Ted Talk, titled “The Tribes We Lead,” Godin describes tribes as a catalyst for change, saying “tribes, not money, not politics, can change our world.” Tribes are powerful… and the idea of “finding a tribe” caters to people’s baser instincts: representing identity, camaraderie, and inclusion.  

Seth Godin says, “Align people into a tribe where they care about each other.” We need to understand where a person is coming from. We want to relate to them and show we understand and care. We want to contribute to their culture. Godin used the example of a Harley Davidson motorcycle versus Suzuki to portray this point. Harley pinpoints their audience as those who value community (or in Nix’s terms, are “agreeable.”) 

 

Step 3 - Don’t play it safe

“In a crowded marketplace, fitting in is a failure. In a busy marketplace, not standing out is the same as being invisible.”

- Seth Godin

When experimenting with psychographic segmentation, influencer marketing, and community-building, marketers will undoubtedly experience a great deal of trial and error. Working through those shortcomings can make for truly innovative marketing campaigns.

If marketers hope to ever truly connect with consumers, they have to stop thinking of things at scale. Start small, understand what people want, and guide them to their tribe.

 

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AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive content updates from AgencySparks, click here to subscribe!
Marketers Toolbox: Sniply

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Marketers Toolbox: Sniply

Note: The Marketer’s Toolbox series teaches our readers about new technology we’re using (or experimenting with) that proves to be useful, productive, or just plain entertaining. As a marketer’s secret weapon, AgencySparks believes that the tools we use are vital to our success, thus, a marketer’s toolbox is truly one of our most important resources.

Marketers Toolbox: Sniply

Becoming a thought leader in an industry is the current flavor of the month, but what does sharing relevant content on social media actually gain?

Sniply makes it easy to add a Call-to-Action to any piece of content, simply copy the content URL, enter it on Sniply, craft a message, add a URL destination for the button, and Sniply creates a custom URL that can be shared on a multitude of platforms. Sniply analytics make it easy to track how the Call-to-Action is doing to determine success.

Pricing:

Don’t just share content without a purpose anymore, by adding a Call-to-Action increase the chance that becoming a thought leader pays off with conversions.

AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive the #MarketersToolbox weekly, click here to subscribe!

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AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive content updates from AgencySparks, click here to subscribe!
Event Recap: May #MarketersBreakfast

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Event Recap: May #MarketersBreakfast

On Wednesday, May 17, 2017 AgencySparks kicked off the day with another successful Marketer’s Breakfast! The AgencySparks team welcomed first-time attendees which included senior marketers from brands like Delta Air Lines, Carrier, and Carter's/OshKosh amidst some familiar faces from Turner Classic Movies, Coca-Cola, Equifax, and Georgia Pacific. 

Within minutes, our private room at Empire State South filled to capacity with enthusiastic (and hungry!) participants ready to share their unique perspectives. After a brief networking period, the food was served and the meeting began.

Since making the initial spark is what we do best, the meeting opened with introductions in order to create an inviting and comfortable atmosphere. As an icebreaker, we asked attendees to share their name, company, and favorite band. It was a fun way to kick off the meeting and get to know each other better.

Teresa Caro (right), SVP of Marketing at FORTIVA, got a good chuckle out of the fact that Laura Berkobin, Director of Digital Marketing for Pull-A-Part, said that her favorite band is anyone who can do a solid cover of “Wonderwall.”

Teresa Caro (right), SVP of Marketing at FORTIVA, got a good chuckle out of the fact that Laura Berkobin, Director of Digital Marketing for Pull-A-Part, said that her favorite band is anyone who can do a solid cover of “Wonderwall.”

There’s never been a shortage of “Bacon, Biscuits, and Knowledge” at any of our previous breakfasts. During this event, we wanted to gain insights from senior marketers and agency leadership about how they measure the performance of their marketing initiatives. AgencySparks solicited questions in advance from the marketers to serve as a catalyst for the discussion.

Initial questions quickly led to contributions across the room:

Measuring Success Looks Different for Every Business

Not surprisingly, companies like Delta Air Lines measure success differently from smaller organizations like Serta Simmons Bedding. What was surprising, however, was just how many ways companies differ in how they measure success.

  • How often do companies measure return on investment (ROI)? Answers ranged from weekly to yearly.
  • Do companies use net promoter score (NPS) in the calculation of brand health? Half of the room said yes, half said no.
  • Is revenue the ultimate measure of ROI? Most companies agreed, but non-profits like The Boys and Girls Club of America valued brand equity more than revenue.

Media and Branding

Timing is everything. Everyone chimed in with agreement when Shannon Harlow, Sr. Director of Marketing Analytics at Equifax, mentioned the time lag between the release of content/products and results.

When analyzing results, companies often focus on the “now now now,” but it’s important to evaluate surrounding factors when it comes to brand success. Distinguishing the difference between gut, intuition, and concrete facts became the focus of the discussion soon after. The air settled when Imran Manji of Sid Mashburn stated that “gut” feeling decisions need to be extracted based on a foundation of data.

Opinions differed regarding releasing content through social media or TV. Danica Kombol, CEO of Everywhere Agency, made the case that using social media to gain traction is more efficient than TV because it is evergreen whereas TV disappears in the long run. However, Jaclyn Cannon, Chief Digital Officer of Iconic Group added that TV provided an instant lift in downloads for mobile products when she worked for The Cartoon Network. Clearly, a recurring theme of the breakfast was that there is no “one-size-fits-all” when it comes to measuring marketing results. Ultimately, success depends on the brand, the ways the brand is presented, and the business model as a whole.

 

The Challenges Marketers Face Moving Forward

Regardless of channel preference, Moira Vetter, CEO of Modo Modo, made a fair point that one way to increase marketing budgets is to highlight the actions of the competition to increase resources and to benchmark success. Some marketers expressed concerns regarding analyzing data accurately when budgets are low and talent is hard to find. Harlow, (Equifax) who has extensive experience building data teams, advised combining engineers with business/marketing people so that both groups benefit from each other’s knowledge/skill.

Lastly, we encouraged attendees to share their experience with measurement tools such as:

  • Google Data Studios
  • App Annie
  • Splunk
  • Sensor Tower
  • CYXE
  • Appfigures
  • Excel
  • Micro Strategies
  • Converge
  • Tableau

Watch these tools in future Marketer’s Toolbox posts! Every Friday we post helpful tools and tips to influence your business in the Marketer’s Toolbox! Check our past posts here.

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AgencySparks ignites meaningful connections for marketers that help drive business. Contact us for introductions. To receive content updates from AgencySparks, click here to subscribe!